Team

The Instituto Socioambiental (ISA) is a Brazilian non-profit civil society organization, whose mission is to propose integrated solutions to social and environmental issues, with a central focus on the defence of social, collective and diffuse environmental and social rights and assets, cultural heritage, human rights and indigenous peoples, quilombolas and traditional peoples. Founded in 1994, ISA was accredited as a public interest civil society organization (OSCIP) in 2001. Organised around regional and national programmes, ISA’s principal purpose is defence of socio-environmental rights, through monitoring and proposing public policy alternatives, research, dissemination, documentation of information, development of participative models of sustainability and institutional strengthening of local partners.

ISA was one of the organizations that succeeded the Ecumenical Documentation and Information Centre (CEDI), continuing its far-reaching work of analysis and dissemination, which constituted the most complete collection on the recent history and current status of indigenous peoples living in Brazil. Although ISA’s public image is often associated with indigenous peoples and their lands, activities regarding Conservation Areas (UCs) predates the founding of ISA. CEDI had housed the embryo of the programme that today monitors, systematizes, analyses and disseminates daily information about UCs.

In 1993, the CEDI Indigenous Land Monitoring Project team began to monitor other federal special use areas in the Brazilian Amazon, including federal Conservation Areas. As a result, many cases of overlaps between indigenous lands and other federal areas were found. The monitoring found that about half the cases of overlap were between Indigenous Lands and Conservation Areas, including fully homologated Indigenous Lands. This analysis anticipated by years a challenge now commonly found in he planning and territorial management of protected areas: that of resolving the impasse of overlaps over and above the simple clash of legal status, necessarily implying the recognition of the importance of Indigenous Lands in the context of a wider political strategy for the preservation and conservation of the Amazon region and taking into account the constitutional right to exclusive use by indigenous groups of the territories they traditionally occupy.

In 1995, in a partnership born of an agreement with the SOS Mata Atlântica Foundation, the status of the remaining areas of the Atlantic Forest began to be evaluated more precisely and, as regards Conservation Areas, at the local level, considering the domain as defined in law, rather than just the Atlantic forest. Subsequent monitoring involved state conservation areas across the country, thus covering other Brazilian biomes. In 2007, ISA launched its Characterization of Conservation Areas in the Brazilian Amazon site, making publicly available a set of information. This was recognized as one of the ten best environmental sites in Brazil (Época Magazine 2008). It was this site that gave rise to online portals on Conservation Areas in the Brazilian Amazon in 2011 and in the whole of Brazil the following year, with approximately one million views a year.

The main objective continues to be to produce and disseminate reliable information that positively influences public policies and the actions of the state and civil society concerning the defence of collective rights, environmental protection and conservation, as well as contributing to societal control of collective natural heritage. The new portals provided basic information on each Conservation Area, federal and state, regarding its management, environmental characterization (watershed, vegetation, speleological heritage, among other information), location, overlap with Indigenous Lands and the sequence of its legal documentation, as well as providing available local and national news on the subject in order to enrich understanding of the political context, pressures and threats, and initiatives and good practices related to each conservation area. Important topics for evaluation of the level of conservation of the area were also made available. The information made available through the portal came from multiple sources with differing scales and timelines, such that data was processed, evaluated and indexed (see the technical specifications below). The option of launching the "Characterization of Conservation Areas in the Brazilian Amazon" site in 2007, followed by the "Conservation Areas in Brazil" site in 2011, and its expansion as "Conservation Units in Brazil", in 2012, showed itself to be a complementary strategy to the already existing portals "Indigenous Peoples in Brazil" and the "Indigenous Lands in Brazil" launched in 2012, that contributed to enriching and deepening a realistic and up-to-date view of the reality of socio-environmental territories and policies in the country.

As regards the origin of users visiting, we jumped from an average of viewers from 67 countries during the first year in 2011 to  170 countries in 2018. The vast majority of users of the site is from Brazil. The content of the ISA Conservation Areas portal, as already explained, is of complex diversity. Besides basic introductory texts and in-depth treatments of some themes, it provides a bespoke cartographic interface to provide information on different themes and at different scales, enabling a rich contextualization of the Brazilian territory. In the section on Conservation Areas, it also presents detailed information on each area, drawn from the Protected Areas Information System, with the addition of diagrams, photographs and a map interface.

ISA’s Protected Area Monitoring Programme continues to believe in the communication of reliable and up-to-date information as an indispensable element in building understanding and capacity within civil society. Thus, the challenge persists of assessing the trends and demands of users in this area and reconciling these with ISA’s objectives and mission, so as to propose and construct integrated solutions to social and environmental issues with a central focus on the defence of social, collective and diffuse goods and rights relating to the environment, cultural heritage, human rights and the rights of peoples.

Who is here and who has helped along the way...?

Who is here?

Overall coordination of the site

Silvia de Melo Futada – MSc Ecology, Social and Environmental Research and Development Analyst

 

Production, organization and editing of content

Beatriz Moraes Murer – Biologist, Social and Environmental Research and Development Analyst

Silvia de Melo Futada – MSc Ecology, Social and Environmental Research and Development Analyst

 

Information monitoring

Beatriz Moraes Murer – Biologist, Social and Environmental Research and Development Analyst

Daniele Leal de Araújo – Intern (Geography)

Letícia Braga Aniceto – Intern (Biology)

Silvia de Melo Futada – MSc Ecology, Social and Environmental Research and Development Analyst

 

Web Production

Beatriz Moraes Murer – Biologist, Social and Environmental Research and Development Analyst

João Ricardo Rampinelli – Web Analyst and Developer

Silvia de Melo Futada – MSc Ecology, Social and Environmental Research and Development Analyst

Silvio Carlos – Web Analyst and Developer

 

Geoprocessing

Cícero Augusto – Cartographic Engineer, Geoprocessing Coordinator

Eliseu Teixeira Neto – Geographer

William Pereira de Lima – Geographer

 

Translations (Prolabore)

Alfredo Zea – Journalist

Anthony R. (Tony) Gross – Political Scientist

 

Who has helped along the way?

Overall coordination

Alicia Rolla – Geographer, Deputy Coordinator, Monitoring Protected Areas Programme

Fany Pantaleoni Ricardo – Anthropologist, Coordinator, Monitoring Protected Areas Programme

 

Organization and editing of content

Bruno Marianno – Environmental Manager, Technical assistant for research and development

Helena Chiaretti Leonel Ferreira – Intern (Biology)

Marina Spindel – Environmental Manager

 

Monitoramento de informações e produção de conteúdo

Bruna Dell Agnolo – Intern (Environmental Management)

Bruno Marianno – Environmental Manager, Technical assistant for research and development

Francisco d'Albertas Gomes de Carvalho – Intern (Biology)

Jackson dos Santos Brito – Intern (Geography)

Lia Taruiap Troncarelli – Intern (Environmental Management)

Luana Lopes de Lucca – Intern (Environmental Management)

Marina Spindel – Environmental Manager

Nurit Rachel Bensusan – PhD Biology

Paula Zaterka Giroldo – Intern (Biology)

Rosely Alvim Sanches – PhD Environmental Sciences

Silvia de Melo Futada – MSc Ecology, Social and Environmental Research and Development Analyst

Thais Bucci Francisco – Oceanographer, Intern (Environmental Management)

 

Web Production

Alex Piaz – Web Analyst and Developer

Bruno Marianno – Environmental Manager, Technical assistant for socio-environmental research and development

Eduardo Ultima – Designer

João Ricardo Rampinelli – Web Analyst and Developer

Marcelo Lopes Oliveira – Web Developer

Marina Spindel – Intern (Environmental Management)

Silvia de Melo Futada – MSc Ecology, Social and Environmental Research and Development Analyst

Silvio Carlos – Analista e Desenvolvedor Web

 

Geoprocessing

Alana Almeida de Souza – Ecologist, Geoprocessing analyst

Alexandre Degan – Geographer, Geoprocessing Analyst

Alicia Rolla – Geographer, Deputy Coordinator, Monitoring Protected Areas Programme

Cícero Augusto – Cartographic Engineer, Geoprocessing Coordinator

Paulo Henrique Aguiar – Geographer, Geoprocessing Technician

Rosimeire Rurico – Geographer, Geoprocessing Technician

Thomas Gallois – Geography student, Technical assistant for socio-environmental research and development

William Pereira de Lima – Intern (Geography)

 

Colaboradores

Adriana Ramos, Ana Paula Leite Prates, Caroline Jeanne Delelis, David Leonardo Bouças da Silva, Enrique Svirsky, Gabriella Contoli, Henry Philippe Ibanez de Novion, Juliana Santilli, Kelly Bonach, Maurício Mercadante, Michele de Sá Dechoum, Nádia Bandeira Sacenco Kornijezuc, Patrícia Pinha, Raul Silva Telles do Vale, Sônia Wiedmann, Thiago Mota Cardoso

 

Traduções (Prolabore)

Harold Martin Wright III – MSc Ecology

David Rodgers – Anthropologist

 

Thanks to all the photographers who collaborated by ceding photos and whose credits appear next to each image.

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